Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Tessuti Eva Dress by the pattern (mostly)

I've made a few Tessuti Eva dress versions over the last few years. I really like the fit of the bodice and the lantern shaped skirt. For my final version (I think this is make number 6), I pretty much followed the pattern. I shortened the bottom panel so that the skirt finishes at my calf rather than just above my somewhat skinny ankles. The other modifications were to add small darts at the waist of the front bodice for extra shaping, to take a pinch out of the back centre to shorten the back to compensate for my short waist and to bind the neckline with self-fabric binding rather than turn it all to the inside as per the pattern. I didn't include the pockets. I used a size Large bodice and a Size Medium skirt and manipulated the sizes at the waist line so the seams matched.
The fabric is a heavy linen which I bought at the Melbourne Fabric Store a couple of summers ago. This is a casual, easy to wear dress that is very stylish.
Front view

Side view

Back view - Showing the creases after wear!

The bound neck line sits beautifully. It's my favourite neckline finish.

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Japanese linen is the focus

With this simple tunic adapted from McCalls 6102, it's the fabric that's the star. The material is a Japanese linen bought from The Cloth Shop last month. I was lucky as there was only 1.7 metres left on the roll which was just enough to make up this A-line (although the photos don't show that it's A-line),  pull over tunic with cap sleeves. It works well with 3/4 length black linen pants. I wore the tunic yesterday and received compliments about my outfit! It's very encouraging when people say "It doesn't look home made".
Front view

Back view
A close up of the self fabric bias binding stitched in the ditch. 

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Tessuti's Eva dress with inverted pleats in the skirt

I've made another dress using the Eva dress bodice, this time the sleeveless bodice, with a self-designed skirt. The skirt has three inverted pleats at both the front and the back, with the larger inverted pleat at centre front and centre back. The fabric I used for this dress is a heavy weight cotton that was better suited to pleats than gathers. I bought the material at Rathdowne Fabrics but I noticed it was also available at The Cloth Shop and Clegs. I spent yesterday afternoon visiting some of Melbourne's well know fabric shops checking out their sales and coming away with some lovely additions to my fabric stash.
Front view
front bodice
Back view
Back bodice

Saturday, December 26, 2015

Tessuti's Eva with a gathered skirt

A few weeks ago I saw a photo on Rachelboodogg's instagram page of her wearing a dress that she had made using the bodice of the Eva dress with a gathered skirt. I thought, what a great idea for a simple summer dress. So here's my Eva dress with a gathered skirt.
I made a few minor adjustments to the bodice: the addition of two small bust darts in the front bodice at the waist line for a better fit, the neckline bound with self-fabric bias binding rather than sewn as a facing and I took a pinch out of the back centre fold to compensate for my short waistedness. The finished length of the skirt is 70 cms and the circumference is 140 cms. The fabric is a vintage cotton that I bought at Rathdowne Fabrics early this year. I don't usually add pockets, generally because it adds to the sewing time, but this time I did include the in seam side pockets.

A very comfortable dress to wear on a hot summer's day.

Monday, December 14, 2015

Stylearc Mary Shift Dress as a tunic

What attracted me to Stylearc's Mary Shift Dress was the raglan sleeve. I had been looking for a simple raglan sleeve dress/top/tunic pattern and was pleased to find this one at Stylearc. Although it is a dress pattern, I shortened it by 20 cms (8 inches) to make it tunic length. I also shortened the sleeves by 2 cm. The front and binding is a textured Japanese cotton while the sleeves and back are made from black linen. The photo doesn't really show it's A-line shape. 
To add some interest to the back I made a slot seam. I remember reading about this type of seam, I think it was in a Threads magazine, some time ago. It's not difficult to do. You sew the seam with a basting stitch, on the inside cover the complete width of the seam allowances with a strip of contrasting fabric, top stitch on the outside (the further from the seam the wider the slot but of course you can't go any wider than the seam allowance), unpick the basting and there you have a slot seam. I used this youtube video for instructions.


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Sunday, December 6, 2015

Daisy Designer Tunic - minus the second hem band

Here's my second version of the Stylearc Daisy Designer Tunic. This time I didn't add the second hem band, so that it would be shorter without having to make adjustments to the pattern. I made it in a linen that crushes at the slightest touch so it will be interesting to see how it copes with a day of wear. The fabric has a subtle check which I managed to line up at the side seams but not so well at the shoulder seams, but you'd have to look really close to notice!  Rather than use the pattern facing I used a self-fabric bias binding that I turned and stitched to the inside of the neck line. The colour is quite bland being beige, but it can be livened up with some colourful accessories.




Sunday, November 15, 2015

Lu Lu Tunic by Stylearc

Here is another Stylearc pattern, the Lu Lu Tunic. All in all I'm happy with it, except if I make it again I won't bother with the arm hole bands, I'll just add a couple of centimetres to the dropped shoulder when cutting out and finish the sleeve with a facing, a hem or binding. I found the arm hole bands fiddly to work with and the sleeves are a snug fit around my upper arms (which is my problem not the fault of the pattern). As suggested by other reviwers of this pattern on Pattern Review, I didn't add the neck opening which meant the back could be cut on the fold. I like the mitred corners of the top's front and back skirt as well as the fit around the neck. I only interfaced the inside of the neck and armhole bands although the pattern instructions called for both sides to be interfaced. As the fabric had enough weight I didn't think it needed the added bulk that the double interfacing would have caused. I used a cotton from the stash as a wearable muslin. I may make this again in a silk that has been sitting patiently in a cupboard for a number of years waiting for the light of day.